Measuring the value of technical writing

This topic has been discussed in technical writing circles for decades. It’s not so much as a discussion as it is folklore in the form of good advice that’s difficult to apply in practice and it’s been around for a long time—this 1995 article by Ginny Redish, “Adding value as a professional technical communicator[1] lists these ways to measure value:

  1. Outcome measures
  2. Ratings of customer satisfaction
  3. Projections (estimates) of value added
  4. General perceptions of the value of technical communicators’ work

I like how she starts with measuring the value added, because if you can’t measure it, then how do you know you have actually delivered it? Further, if you can’t measure it, how can you show improvement in that—(a) whatever it is, it’s now better and (b) it’s better because of a decision you implemented. That’s a trick question. You can’t. So, how can you measure this? Continue reading “Measuring the value of technical writing”